Applied Technotopia

We scan the digital environment to examine the leading trends in emerging technology today to know more about future.



We have added a few indices around the site. Though we look to the future, we need to keep an eye on the present as well:

Recent Tweets @leerobinsonp

A graphic look at the aging of the US population.

shortformblog:

pewresearch:

As Business Insider put it, “Watch America age 110 years in one gif.”

See more on the demographic transformation of The Next America here

Anyone else find it intriguing that there will be more people over the age of 85 in 2060 than there will be people in their late 70s?

(via washingtonpost)

 Our daily Shuttle magnificence!

supersonic-youth:

Discovery

(via supplyside)

Looking back at Apollo 16.

humanoidhistory:

On April 16, 1972, the Apollo 16 mission blasted off from Cape Canaveral on a journey to the Moon. Astronauts John Young, Charlie Duke, and Ken Mattingly went on the penultimate adventure of the Apollo program with a mission that lasted 11 days, 1 hour, and 51 minutes, ending at 2:45 PM EST on April 27.

(via science-and-things)

Lets hope enough energy is released to prevent a megaquake in Tokyo.

The people of Tokyo have long lived in fear of another great earthquake, and those fears are increasingly justified. Slow-motion earthquakes have become more common beneath the city in the last few years, causing tectonic stresses to build up. The after-effects of the 2011 Tōhoku megaquake are also prodding the area in the direction of a big quake, but seismologists cannot predict when it might occur, nor which part of the region’s complex fault system will break. (via  New Scientist)

Image: Japan’s Great Kantō earthquake of 1923 killed 100,000 people (Image: Bettmann/Corbis)

Tectonic plates

(Credit: WikiCommons)

This paper microscope is simply brilliant design.

IF EVER a technology were ripe for disruption, it is the microscope. Benchtop microscopes have remained essentially unchanged since the 19th century—their shape a cartoonist’s cliché of science akin to alchemical glassware and Bunsen burners. And that lack of change has costs. Microscopes are expensive (several hundred dollars for a reasonable one) and need to be serviced and maintained. Unfortunately, one important use of them is in poor-world laboratories and clinics, for identifying pathogens, and such places often have small budgets and lack suitably trained technicians. (via Cheap microscopes: Yours to cut out and keep | The Economist)

Google Glass isn’t even publicly available yet, and the Luddites are already opposing it.

The wearable technology space is taking off in a big way and no product has garnered more attention than Google Glass. It has enormous potential, yet a growing movement firmly opposes it – despite the fact there’s still no word on when it will come out as a real product, or what it will cost. What is it about Google Glass that has businesses pre-emptively banning it, an anti-surveillance group campaigning against it, and even a software subscription service called Anti-Glass? (via Digital Trends)