Applied Technotopia

We scan the digital environment to examine the leading trends in emerging technology today to know more about future.


We have added a few indices around the site. Though we look to the future, we need to keep an eye on the present as well:

Recent Tweets @leerobinsonp

Stephen Hawking and the robot uprising?Well not quite, but he warns that AI has risks involved.

neurosciencestuff:

Artificial intelligence ‘could be the worst thing to happen to humanity’: Stephen Hawking warns that rise of robots may be disastrous for mankind

A sinister threat is brewing deep inside the technology laboratories of Silicon Valley.

Artificial Intelligence, disguised as helpful digital assistants and self-driving vehicles, is gaining a foothold – and it could one day spell the end for mankind.

This is according to Stephen Hawking who has warned that humanity faces an uncertain future as technology learns to think for itself and adapt to its environment.

Read more

A look at how states joined the EU.

mapsontheweb:

Enlargement of the European Union

A look at world imports in 2012 (via Business Insider)

A look at world exports in 2012 (via Business Insider)

Renewable kerosene is one step closer.

probablyasocialecologist:

Synthesized ‘solar’ jet fuel: Renewable kerosene from sunlight, water and carbon dioxide

Artist’s rendering of the functional principle. Image: SOLAR-JET

With the first ever production of synthesized “solar” jet fuel, the EU-funded SOLAR-JET project has successfully demonstrated the entire production chain for renewable kerosene obtained directly from sunlight, water and carbon dioxide (CO2), therein potentially revolutionizing the future of aviation. This process has also the potential to produce any other type of fuel for transport applications, such as diesel, gasoline or pure hydrogen in a more sustainable way.

Several notable research organizations from academia through to industry (ETH Zürich, Bauhaus Luftfahrt, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), ARTTIC and Shell Global Solutions) have explored a thermochemical pathway driven by concentrated solar energy. A new solar reactor technology has been pioneered to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels suitable for more sustainable transportation.
"Increasing environmental and supply security issues are leading the aviation sector to seek alternative fuels which can be used interchangeably with today’s jet fuel, so-called drop-in solutions," states Dr. Andreas Sizmann, the project coordinator at Bauhaus Luftfahrt. "With this first-ever proof-of-concept for ‘solar’ kerosene, the SOLAR-JET project has made a major step towards truly sustainable fuels with virtually unlimited feedstocks in the future.

(via scinerds)

A look at Europe’s unemployment rates as at March 2014.

mapsontheweb:

Europe Unemployment Rates March 2014

Graphene seems to offer endless wonder with its amazing properties.
laboratoryequipment:

Physicists Change Crystal Structure of GrapheneA Univ. of Arizona-led team of physicists has discovered how to change the crystal structure of graphene with an electric field, an important step toward the possible use of graphene in microprocessors that would be smaller and faster than current, silicon-based technology.Graphene consists of extremely thin sheets of graphite: when writing with a pencil, graphene sheets slough off the pencil’s graphite core and stick to the page. If placed under a high-powered electron microscope, graphene reveals its sheet-like structure of cross-linked carbon atoms, resembling chicken wire. When manipulated by an electric field, parts of the material are transformed from behaving as a metal to behaving as a semiconductor, the UA physicists found.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/physicists-change-crystal-structure-graphene

Graphene seems to offer endless wonder with its amazing properties.

laboratoryequipment:

Physicists Change Crystal Structure of Graphene

A Univ. of Arizona-led team of physicists has discovered how to change the crystal structure of graphene with an electric field, an important step toward the possible use of graphene in microprocessors that would be smaller and faster than current, silicon-based technology.

Graphene consists of extremely thin sheets of graphite: when writing with a pencil, graphene sheets slough off the pencil’s graphite core and stick to the page. If placed under a high-powered electron microscope, graphene reveals its sheet-like structure of cross-linked carbon atoms, resembling chicken wire. When manipulated by an electric field, parts of the material are transformed from behaving as a metal to behaving as a semiconductor, the UA physicists found.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/physicists-change-crystal-structure-graphene

(via starstuffblog)