Applied Technotopia

We scan the digital environment to examine the leading trends in emerging technology today to know more about future.


We have added a few indices around the site. Though we look to the future, we need to keep an eye on the present as well:

Recent Tweets @leerobinsonp

Rebooting old spacecraft.

abcstarstuff:

Citizen Scientists Successfully Communicate with Spacecraft

A group of citizen scientists has successfully established communication with an inactive NASA spacecraft in an attempt to breathe new scientific life into a more than 35-year-old agency mission.

NASA signed a Non-Reimbursable Space Act Agreement (NRSAA) with Skycorp, Inc., in Los Gatos, California, on May 21 that allows the company to contact, and possibly command and control, NASA’s International Sun-Earth Explorer-3 (ISEE-3) spacecraft as part of the company’s ISEE-3 Reboot Project. On May 29, the project team established two-way communication with the ISEE-3 spacecraft and began commanding it to perform specific functions.

First contact with ISEE-3 was achieved at the Arecibo Radio Observatory in Puerto Rico. The initial contact was a tone followed by specific commands. The team has changed modes so the spacecraft will broadcast telemetry information. Over the coming days and weeks they are planning to assess the spacecraft’s overall health and refine the techniques required to fire its engines and bring it back to an orbit near Earth.

"NASA congratulates the ISEE-3 Reboot Project team and everyone involved in establishing communications with the ISEE-3 spacecraft," said Allard Beutel, NASA spokesperson in Washington. "The team now is finding out whether the scientific instruments on board might be functional. The contribution of the citizen science from ISEE-3, if recovered, will be highly dependent on the status of the instruments. This creative effort to recapture the spacecraft has already engaged citizen scientists and citizen spacecraft operators and is capturing the curiosity of the next generation."

This is the first time NASA has worked such an agreement for use of a spacecraft the agency is no longer using or ever planned to use again. The NRSAA details the technical, safety, legal and proprietary issues that will be addressed before any attempts are made to communicate with or control the 1970’s-era spacecraft as it nears the Earth in August.

A look at urbanization at its extreme - Kawloon was once considered the most densely populated area in the world.

seancregan:

Via overstate, one of the most fascinating places there ever was, and one of the chief inspirations for THE LEVELS:

Kowloon Walled City | A population density nightmare

Kowloon Walled City was a largely ungoverned Chinese settlement in Kowloon, Hong Kong, comprising of 350 interconnected high-rise buildings where 33,000 residents lived within a plot measuring just 210 meter by 120 meter. Originally a Chinese military fort, the Walled City became an enclave after the New Territories were leased to Britain in 1898. Its population increased dramatically following the Japanese occupation of Hong Kong during World War II and reached a peak of 33,000 residents in 1987. When it was demolished in 1993-94, it was thought to be the most densely populated place on earth.

(via supplyside)

A look at NASA's test vehicle for landing payloads on Mars.

A saucer-shaped test vehicle holding equipment for landing large payloads on Mars is shown in the Missile Assembly Building at the US Navy’s Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kaua’i, Hawaii. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech (via NASA Coverage for Saucer-Shaped Test Vehicle Flight - NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory)

Crowdfunding synthetic life.

One of the undersold boons of the internet is that it functions a bit like a permanent, rolling global coffee break. A good example of the result is OpenWorm, an informal collaboration of biologists and computer scientists from America, Britain, Russia and elsewhere. On May 19th this group managed to raise $121,076 on Kickstarter, a crowd-funding website. The money will be put towards the creation of the world’s most detailed virtual life form—an accurate, open-source, digital clone of a critter called Caenorhabditis elegans, a 1mm-long nematode that lives in the soils of the world’s temperate regions. (via Virtual biology: Computer worms | The Economist)

A look at  SpaceX's Dragon V2 cockpit.

space-pics:

The evolution of spacecraft cockpits: the 1960s to today
http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

Goodbye fillings, hello laser-treatment? Certainly a medical breakthrough to watch.

scienceyoucanlove:

scandaliciousthings:

scienceyoucanlove:

No more fillings! Scientists have figured out how to regenerate dentin, the material inside our teeth, and all it takes is a quick blast with a low-powered laser.

Read more: http://bit.ly/SiZw8r

source 

Teeth is the only part of the body that cannot repair itself…bull i say

So teeth do not grow back but scientists are trying to stimulate stem cells in the teeth to regenerate denten! It actually sounds pretty interesting, the article that the above article sources can be found here, here’s an except too, if you’re on a phone or something: 

Teeth don’t grow back, as your dentist might like to remind you while revving up the drill for a root canal. But scientists have now found a way to regenerate dentin, the hard stuff in the middle of the tooth, right in the mouth. It’s surprisingly simple, too—all it takes is a blast of laser.

In a study published today in Science Translational Medicine, a Harvard-led team lays out how a low-power laser can trigger stem cells in the tooth to form dentin. Currently, damaged dentin is replaced with synthetic material, like when you get a filling or a root canal.

The current study builds on years of anecdotal reports about low-power laser stimulating skinor hair growth. (Yes, at the same time high-power lasers do the opposite.) Something about laser light stimulates certain biological pathways in cells. Scientists have now figured what thatsomething is when it comes to dentin. A blast of laser induces reactive oxygen species, which are chemically active molecules that then activate a growth factor to stimulate dentin growth.

Although studies have regenerated parts of a tooth from stem cells in a petri dish before, the laser procedure can happen right in the mouth. This study’s authors got it to work in tiny rodent teeth, and now they’re continuing onto human clinical trials in hope it could someday replace some current dental procedures. I don’t know if the thought of even low-power lasers makes the dentist less terrifying, but I’d take it over a root canal. [Science Translational Medicine]

Also, here’s a link to the original paper, I’ve not read it and I think it might be behind a paywall so I’ll try to get better info for it. I really appreciate people asking/commenting about things instead of just hitting ‘reblog’ btw, even if I get called out or someone calls bull or bias, I would rather have that than people not thinking at all!

What do you think about Google Glass? For or against it? And why?