Applied Technotopia

We scan the digital environment to examine the leading trends in emerging technology today to know more about future.


We have added a few indices around the site. Though we look to the future, we need to keep an eye on the present as well:

Recent Tweets @leerobinsonp

Our daily Shuttle magnificence!

humanoidhistory:

The Space Shuttle Columbia blasts off from Cape Canaveral’s Launch Pad 39A at 2:02pm on July 1, 1997. (NASA)

(via s-c-i-guy)

A graphic look at the increase in space debris around earth.
policymic:

There’s 6,300 tonnes of space junk orbiting Earth — Astonishing interactive visualizations

A graphic look at the increase in space debris around earth.

policymic:

There’s 6,300 tonnes of space junk orbiting Earth — Astonishing interactive visualizations

(via science-junkie)

The chart offers an interesting snapshot of the global economy for the last 1000 years.

stoweboyd:

World Economy Share Since 1000 - Business Insider

A great snapshot.

Space food, yum!

placeofpluto:

rocketumbl:

NASA Space food

Apollo/Gemini: We let your Mom pack some sandwiches,

Apollo: We  put everything in a blender, yesh?

Skylab: Would you like a 1940 Chardonnay with that?

Shuttle: We found this with our camp supplies.

ISS: DIY, we’re engineers, not cooks.

A look at a flock of 28 cubesats launched from the ISS recently.

joshbyard:

ISS Launches Largest Ever Flock of CubeSats, Data Will Be Open to Public

A new fleet of 28 small satellites, called Flock 1… the largest single constellation of Earth-imaging satellites ever to launch into space, …began deploying today from the International Space Station. 

Built and operated by Planet Labs of San Francisco, the Flock 1 small satellites are individually referred to as Doves. The Dove satellites are part of a class of miniature satellites often called CubeSats. These small satellites will capture imagery of Earth for use in humanitarian, environmental and commercial applications. Data collected by the Flock 1 constellation will be universally accessible to anyone who wishes to use it.

“We believe that the democratization of information about a changing planet is the mission that we are focused on, and that, in and of itself, is going to be quite valuable for the planet,” says Robbie Schingler, co-founder of Planet Labs. “One tenet that we have is to make sure that we produce more value than we actually capture, so we have an open principle within the company with respect to anyone getting access to the data.”

(via Largest Flock of Earth-Imaging Satellites Launch into Orbit From Space Station ht crookedindifference)

Foreigners may be stealing your job, but maybe if someone with no contacts, money, or ability to speak English can steal your job, you deserve to have it stolen.

Or Dutch, or Spanish….. or whatever language.

Louis CK (via we-are-star-stuff)

(via we-are-star-stuff)

Is too much emphasis placed in science on publishing in high impact journals? Or is it a necessity for research that has become the be all and end of research instead of a form of quality control?

“Basically, the minute my first paper was published in Nature, I received offers of tenure from 5 different Universities” our source said… [Priceless]

theolduvaigorge:

Authors of Nature papers couldn’t give a damn what you think, survey finds

Researchers who publish in high impact journals, such as Nature, Science and Cell, couldn’t give a shit what anyone else thinks, a recent survey has found.

In recent years, high-impact journals have taken a lot of criticism from some parts of the scientific community, accused of publishing non-replicable or obscure results, incomplete methods or science that is just plain wrong.

Indeed, there is a suggestion that Science will be published in cartoon format from now on. However, our survey has revealed that the authors of papers in NatureScience and Cellsimply don’t care.

“Basically, the minute my first paper was published in Nature, I received offers of tenure from 5 different Universities” our source said. ”I have two funded PhD students, 3 funded post-docs and a $1m budget to set up my lab.  The paper has been cited over 100 times.  You think I give a *&^! what anyone else thinks?  I’m made!”

Another respondent continued “We know there’s a minority out there who criticise the top journals, but 99.9% of scientists would love to be us.  Papers in NatureScience and Cell make a guy’s career and everyone else is just jealous.  As for Handy Randy Schekman?  Yeah, good luck with eLife, mate.  A lot of people want to create a high-impact journal; very few manage it”.

Several of the survey respondents had filled their survey in using gold leaf pen, and one included a picture of themselves driving away in their Porsche.”

***HA!

(Source: The Science Web)

(via project-argus)