Applied Technotopia

We scan the digital environment to examine the leading trends in emerging technology today to know more about future.


We have added a few indices around the site. Though we look to the future, we need to keep an eye on the present as well:

Recent Tweets @leerobinsonp
Posts tagged "China"

This slideshow offers a glimpse into the architectural wonders of the future.

The world’s tallest twin towers are set to be built in Wuhan, China. The 3,280ft (1 kilometre)-tall Phoenix Towers will feature the world’s tallest kaleidoscope and floating restaurants that hover in vast globes (via Future world wonders)

This robot restuarant in Kunshan, China offers a glimpse into the future.

futurescope:

Robot restaurant where machines cook and serve food to customers

A restaurant in Kunshan, China, employed a team of 15 androids to cook and deliver food. The cute side of the Robocalypse. 

The restaurant has a total of 15 robots in heights of 1.2 meters. Each robot costs 40,000 yuan (6500 US dollars).

As doormen, cooks and waiters, the robots can work continuously for eleven hours after a night charge, and are able to use 40 basic language expressions, such as welcoming sentences to customers.

Singular instance? Nope. There is another restaurant in Harbin, China with 18 robot workers and a fully automated japanese sushi restaurant.

[read more] [photo credit AFP PHOTO / JOHANNES EISELE]

(via scienceyoucanlove)

A look at urbanization at its extreme - Kawloon was once considered the most densely populated area in the world.

seancregan:

Via overstate, one of the most fascinating places there ever was, and one of the chief inspirations for THE LEVELS:

Kowloon Walled City | A population density nightmare

Kowloon Walled City was a largely ungoverned Chinese settlement in Kowloon, Hong Kong, comprising of 350 interconnected high-rise buildings where 33,000 residents lived within a plot measuring just 210 meter by 120 meter. Originally a Chinese military fort, the Walled City became an enclave after the New Territories were leased to Britain in 1898. Its population increased dramatically following the Japanese occupation of Hong Kong during World War II and reached a peak of 33,000 residents in 1987. When it was demolished in 1993-94, it was thought to be the most densely populated place on earth.

(via supplyside)

A company in China's proposed floating city.

wildcat2030:

Chinese company wants to build this spectacular floating city
-
With so many of China’s 1.4 billion people clustered around its coastline, things can get pretty crowded. So instead of using more precious land space to build the cities of the future, a Chinese company has proposed using some of the 71 percent of the Earth’s surface that’s covered by water for expansion. Floating City will be a four square mile structure that floats like an iceberg, with some of the surface structure visible above the surface, but most of the action happening down below the waterline. Built on land in large hexagonal sections, the pieces will be slotted together like a giant jigsaw puzzle in the ocean. Designed to be totally self-sufficient, Floating City will have its own farms and waste disposal systems, and will offer everything from housing to entertainment, sports complexes and shopping. Transportation will be provided using a series of underwater tunnels and submarines. (via Chinese company wants to build this spectacular floating city | DVICE)

Yutu stirs after being declared dead!

breakingnews:

China’s lunar rover functioning day after being declared dead

The GuardianA day after it was declared dead, China’s Jade Rabbit lunar rover communicated with the nation’s space program, state media reported Thursday. 

After a night of extreme cold on the moon, China’s space program reported its first moon rover had lost function. Citing a combination of mechanical issues in addition to the low temperatures, the program reported the rover dead. However, on Thursday, the program said that “it came back to life.” 

It is unclear how much function returned to the rover, but the program said it now believes it is possible to save it. 

Photo: China’s Jade Rabbit moon rover after it landed on the lunar surface. (AP/Xinhua)

(via spaceexp)

An interesting size comparison of China´s provinces comparing their GDP to those of other countries.

mapsontheweb:

Chinese Provinces as Countries with Similar GDP

Source: youni89 (reddit)

A look at Luck Money during China´s Spring Festival.

cctvnews:

Chinese Spring Festival essentials: Luck money, or ‘Ya Sui Qian’

There is a special privilege for children and teenagers during the Spring Festival in China: Ya Sui Qian, or the ‘luck money’. Wrapped in red envelopes, it is usually a monetary gift given by their elderly relatives to the younger generation, symbolizing a good luck in the New Year.

However, not everyone welcomes the tradition of giving out luck money. Many have complained that they are suffering from what is called ‘the stress of Ya Sui Qian’. In these pictures, we give you some insights of the luck money: