Applied Technotopia

We scan the digital environment to examine the leading trends in emerging technology today to know more about future.


We have added a few indices around the site. Though we look to the future, we need to keep an eye on the present as well:

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Posts tagged "Innovation"

A very innovative personal security device. (A tazor version could be quite interesting as well).

aggressivenotpassive:

odditymall:

The Defender is a pepper spray that when sprayed takes a picture of the person you’re spraying and sends it the police along with your GPS location, user information, as well as flashing a bright light in the attackers face and emitting a loud alarm.

—->http://odditymall.com/pepper-spray-that-takes-a-picture-and-alerts-the-police

Im so happy that the advertisement features a really average “white frat boy, youre gonna see everywhere guy" vs. the "stereo-typical hooded thug, obviously very dangerous guy" that defense adds usually feature UuU

(via galaxyclusters)

A very innovative solar powered smart bench.

alexob:

The solar powered smart bench

A new initiative in Boston is bringing Soofas, solar powered benches that can not only charge your gadgets, but also monitor air quality and sound levels, to several city parks in a pilot program 

The Soofas, called “smart urban furniture”, were developed by Changing Environments, a spinoff of MIT Media Lab, and are capable of charging mobile gadgets via two USB ports, thanks to a solar panels and the free energy of the sun. And while they’re charging phones and powering Facebook updates, they’re also gathering environmental data about air quality and noise levels nearby, and uploading them to a public map online.

LG to make these flexible OLED TVs by 2017.

Not content with making the world’s biggest bendy OLED telly, LG has thrown a different curve entirely with its roll-up OLED display. The 18-inch flexible panel has a 1280 x 810 resolution and uses a film of high-performance plastic called polyimide to give it its flexibility. (via The Register)

A very innovative pocket-sized printer.

radimus-co-uk:

enochliew:

Pocket Printer by Zuta Labs

Not only a portable design, but able to print on any size page.

it finally feels like 2014

(via invaderxan)

A look at an innovative 3D printed braille smartphone.

springwise:

OwnFone launches world’s first 3D printed Braille phone

While smartphones can do incredible things these days, they’re still too expensive or complicated for some consumers, such as the elderly, disabled or technophobic. We wrote about OwnFone back in 2012 when it began offering cheap and small customizable phones that only receive and make calls to pre-selected numbers. Now the company is back with the Braille Phone, a credit-card sized device that can be easily used by those without full vision. READ MORE…

A very innovative idea to turn salt water into potable water.

disrupteneurs:

The Disrupteneur of the day award goes to Gabriele Diamanti. This is beautiful story 

business-and-technology:

GABRIELE DIAMANTI HOPES TO SEE LOCAL CRAFTSMEN ALL OVER THE WORLD ADAPT HIS DESIGN.

“Projects ‘for the 90%’ mostly fall somewhere between two extremes: charity and business,” designer Gabriele Diamanti tells Co.Design. “Neither was my inspiration!” Instead, spurred on by his own extensive travel and friends’ involvement in NGOs, he developed a fascination with global water scarcity as a graduate student at Milan Polytechnic in 2005; he recently decided to pursue his interest again and the result is Eliodomestico, an open-source variation on a solar still.

It functions by filling the black boiler with salty sea water in the morning, then tightening the cap. As the temperature and pressure grows, steam is forced downwards through a connection pipe and collects in the lid, which acts as a condenser, turning the steam into fresh water. Once Diamanti established the fundamentals were sound, he experimented with a series of concepts for the aesthetic of the object. “My goal was to design something friendly and recognizable for the users,” he explains. “The process developed quite naturally to determine the current shape; every detail is there for a reason, so the form, as well as production techniques, represent a compromise between technical and traditional.” Primary field studies in sub-Saharan Africa revealed the habit of carrying goods on the head—also a common practice in other areas around the world—and this was integrated into Eliodomestico’s plan. And while solar stills aren’t a totally new concept, Diamanti says it’s rare to find them in a domestic context rather than in missions or hospitals, or as large plants overseen by qualified personnel that serve entire communities. “I tried to make something for a real household that could be operated directly by the families,” he says.

The project recently won a Core77 Design Award for Social Impact; already, Diamanti has received international feedback, and hopes to see locals adapt and modify the design to take advantage of their own readily available materials and native environments. “The idea is that instructions for the project can be delivered to craftsmen” with the help of NGOs, he says, then a micro-credit program could be established to finance small-scale start-ups specializing in production. “So the NGO is the spark, micro-credit is the fuse, the local craftsmen are the bomb!”

(via disrupteneurs)

This paper microscope is simply brilliant design.

IF EVER a technology were ripe for disruption, it is the microscope. Benchtop microscopes have remained essentially unchanged since the 19th century—their shape a cartoonist’s cliché of science akin to alchemical glassware and Bunsen burners. And that lack of change has costs. Microscopes are expensive (several hundred dollars for a reasonable one) and need to be serviced and maintained. Unfortunately, one important use of them is in poor-world laboratories and clinics, for identifying pathogens, and such places often have small budgets and lack suitably trained technicians. (via Cheap microscopes: Yours to cut out and keep | The Economist)