Applied Technotopia

We scan the digital environment to examine the leading trends in emerging technology today to know more about future.


We have added a few indices around the site. Though we look to the future, we need to keep an eye on the present as well:

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Posts tagged "Science"

These oxygen absording crystals have numerous uses, from diving, fuels cells to space travel.

"Researchers from the University of Southern Denmark say they’ve invented a crystal that pulls oxygen out of the air and even water. Apparently, just a spoonful of the stuff can suck up all the oxygen in a room. " (to be released later) - PopSci

A look at the most light absorbent material ever created - made with carbon nanotubes.

thatruskieyakattack:

completed-nihilism:

Vantablack

British researchers have created the ‘new black’ of the science world - and it is being dubbed super black.

The material absorbs all but 0.035 per cent of light, a new world record, and is so dark the human eye struggles to discern its shape and dimension, giving the appearance of a black hole.

Named Vantablack, or super black, it also conducts heat seven and half times more effectively than copper, and is ten times stronger than steel.

It is created by Surrey NanoSystems using carbon nanotubes, which are 10,000 thinner than human hair and so miniscule that light cannot get in but can pass into the gaps in between.

Article

(via s-c-i-guy)

Quantum data teleportation achieved in Delft, the Netherlands.

business-and-technology:

Scientists achieve reliable quantum teleportation for first time
Einstein is wrong? That’s the potential outcome of a quantum mechanics study as scientists race to disprove his views on entanglement.

Albert Einstein once told a friend that quantum mechanics doesn’t hold water in his scientific world view because “physics should represent a reality in time and space, free from spooky actions at a distance.” That spooky action at a distance is entanglement, a quantum phenomenon in which two particles, separated by any amount of distance, can instantaneously affect one another as if part of a unified system.

Now, scientists have successfully hijacked that quantum weirdness — doing so reliably for the first time — to produce what many sci-fi fans have long dreamt up: teleportation. No, not beaming humans aboard the USS Enterprise, but the teleportation of data.

Physicists at the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, part of the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands, report that they sent quantum data concerning the spin state of an electron to another electron about 10 feet away. Quantum teleportation has been recorded in the past, but the results in this study have an unprecedented replication rate of 100 percent at the current distance, the team said.

Thanks to the strange properties of entanglement, this allows for that data — only quantum data, not classical information like messages or even simple bits — to be teleported seemingly faster than the speed of light. The news was reported first by The New York Times on Thursday, following the publication of a paper in the journal Science.

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How to make DIY Graphene.
alexob:

You too can make Nobel Prize winning, super-material Graphene! 
Here is how:
First, pour some graphite powder into a blender. Add water and dishwashing liquid, and mix at high speed. Congratulations, you just made the wonder material graphene.
This surprisingly simple recipe is now the easiest way to mass-produce pure graphene – sheets of carbon just one atom thick. 
If you need a reminder on graphene and its super powers then read up on it here.

How to make DIY Graphene.

alexob:

You too can make Nobel Prize winning, super-material Graphene!

Here is how:

First, pour some graphite powder into a blender. Add water and dishwashing liquid, and mix at high speed. Congratulations, you just made the wonder material graphene.

This surprisingly simple recipe is now the easiest way to mass-produce pure graphene – sheets of carbon just one atom thick. 

If you need a reminder on graphene and its super powers then read up on it here.

Is too much emphasis placed in science on publishing in high impact journals? Or is it a necessity for research that has become the be all and end of research instead of a form of quality control?

“Basically, the minute my first paper was published in Nature, I received offers of tenure from 5 different Universities” our source said… [Priceless]

theolduvaigorge:

Authors of Nature papers couldn’t give a damn what you think, survey finds

Researchers who publish in high impact journals, such as Nature, Science and Cell, couldn’t give a shit what anyone else thinks, a recent survey has found.

In recent years, high-impact journals have taken a lot of criticism from some parts of the scientific community, accused of publishing non-replicable or obscure results, incomplete methods or science that is just plain wrong.

Indeed, there is a suggestion that Science will be published in cartoon format from now on. However, our survey has revealed that the authors of papers in NatureScience and Cellsimply don’t care.

“Basically, the minute my first paper was published in Nature, I received offers of tenure from 5 different Universities” our source said. ”I have two funded PhD students, 3 funded post-docs and a $1m budget to set up my lab.  The paper has been cited over 100 times.  You think I give a *&^! what anyone else thinks?  I’m made!”

Another respondent continued “We know there’s a minority out there who criticise the top journals, but 99.9% of scientists would love to be us.  Papers in NatureScience and Cell make a guy’s career and everyone else is just jealous.  As for Handy Randy Schekman?  Yeah, good luck with eLife, mate.  A lot of people want to create a high-impact journal; very few manage it”.

Several of the survey respondents had filled their survey in using gold leaf pen, and one included a picture of themselves driving away in their Porsche.”

***HA!

(Source: The Science Web)

(via 2voyager)

Daily Shuttle Magnificence! (Happy 2014 everyone!)

Daily Shuttle Magnificence! (Happy 2014 everyone!)

(via sagansense)

An interesting scientific find with prospects - fungus to clean radiation?

thatscienceguy:

The fungus, now a subclass of its own - radiotrophic - convert, specifically gamma, radiation using the melanin pigment.

Experiments showed that samples exposed to gamma radiation experienced acetate accumulation and biomass growth up to 4 times faster than those without exposure.

It is currently not clear if they use the same process as phototrophic organisms (photosynthesis.)