Applied Technotopia

We scan the digital environment to examine the leading trends in emerging technology today to know more about future.


We have added a few indices around the site. Though we look to the future, we need to keep an eye on the present as well:

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Posts tagged "cern"
RETRACTION: Large Hadron Collider and Black holes (which I fell into)
Dear Readers and Followers,
You may have noticed the post from yesterday linking to  Update on the LHC-Danger – after Half a Year. (I have subsequently removed it). The details of which purported that the LHC facility at CERN was going to  produce “ultraslow miniature black holes”. They appear to be unfounded and more sensationalist than verifiable fact (from what I can see).
I’m not going to make excuses about that one. Publishing it was an error in judgement and a lesson about checking sources if something seems too fantastical. Nonetheless I do wish to apologize to my readers and thank those who pointed out the error. I try to maintain as credible a blog here as possible to monitor emerging technology and I value your support and readership.
Regards, Lee
(Image Credit:The Large Hadron Collider/ATLAS at CERN)

RETRACTION: Large Hadron Collider and Black holes (which I fell into)

Dear Readers and Followers,

You may have noticed the post from yesterday linking to  Update on the LHC-Danger – after Half a Year. (I have subsequently removed it). The details of which purported that the LHC facility at CERN was going to  produce “ultraslow miniature black holes”. They appear to be unfounded and more sensationalist than verifiable fact (from what I can see).

I’m not going to make excuses about that one. Publishing it was an error in judgement and a lesson about checking sources if something seems too fantastical. Nonetheless I do wish to apologize to my readers and thank those who pointed out the error. I try to maintain as credible a blog here as possible to monitor emerging technology and I value your support and readership.

Regards, Lee

(Image Credit:The Large Hadron Collider/ATLAS at CERN)

Physics: Cooking up “almost-perfect liquids”.

ikenbot:

Hottest Particle Soup May Reveal Secrets of Primordial Universe

Image: An ordinary proton or neutron (foreground) is formed of three quarks bound together by gluons, carriers of the color force. Above a critical temperature, protons and neutrons and other forms of hadronic matter “melt” into a hot, dense soup of free quarks and gluons (background), the quark-gluon plasma. Credit: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

A soup of ultra-hot elementary particles could be the key to understanding what the universe was like just after its formation, scientists say.

Over the past few years, physicists have created this soup inside two of the world’s most powerful particle accelerators — the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Switzerland and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in New York — by smashing particles together at superfast speeds.

When two particles collide, they explode into pure energy powerful enough to melt down atoms and break apart protons and neutrons (the building blocks of atomic nuclei) into their constituent quarks and gluons. Protons and neutrons contain three quarks each, and gluons are the mass-less glue that holds the quarks together.

The result is a plasma scientists call an “almost-perfect liquid,” with almost zero friction.

Hotter than the sun

At temperatures between 7 trillion and 10 trillion degrees Fahrenheit (4 trillion and 6 trillion degrees Celsius), this “quark-gluon plasma” is the hottest thing ever created on Earth, and is about 100,000 times hotter than the center of the sun.

“We now have created matter in a unique state, composed of quarks and gluons that have been liberated from inside protons and neutrons,” said Steven Vigdor, a physicist at Brookhaven National Laboratory, which hosts the RHIC. This bizarre state of matter is thought to closely resemble the form of matter in the universe just a few fractions of a second after it was born in the Big Bang about 13.7 billion years ago.

“Many critical features of the universe were established at those very early moments in the infancy of the universe,” Vigdor said today (Aug. 13) at the Quark Matter 2012 particle physicists conference in Washington, D.C.

Soon after this phase of the universe, quarks and gluons would have combined to form protons and neutrons, which would have grouped with electrons a while later to form atoms. These eventually built the galaxies, stars and planets that we know today.

Full Article

Higgs Boson particle found (or something at least). So what is it? Watch the clip to find out:

the-star-stuff:

Physicists Have Found the Higgs Boson

At a meeting held at CERN this morning, scientists presented the latest results from the search for the long-sought Higgs particle. After 30 years of research and $9 billion of investment, they’ve changed the face of physics forever: they’ve found the Higgs boson.

wired:

One of the biggest debuts in the science world could happen in a matter of weeks: The Higgs boson may finally, really have been discovered!

(via starstuffblog)