Applied Technotopia

We scan the digital environment to examine the leading trends in emerging technology today to know more about future.



We have added a few indices around the site. Though we look to the future, we need to keep an eye on the present as well:

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Posts tagged "law enforcement"

German drones to spot graffiti artists.

alexob:

Drone police to crack down on graffiti artists.

The BBC reports that Germany’s national railway company, Deutsche Bahn, plans to test small drones to try to reduce the amount of graffiti being sprayed on its property.

Big Data: Using network analysis for law enforcement.

joshbyard:

Big Data vs. The Zetas: Law Enforcement Using Social Network Analysis To Improve Anti-Cartel Strategy

Complexity analysis depicts drugs cartels as a complex network with each member as a node and their interactions as lines between them. Algorithms compute the strength and importance of the connections.

At first glance, taking out a central “hub” seems like a good idea. When Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar was killed in 1993, for example, the Medellin cartel he was in charge of fell apart. But like a hydra, chopping off the head only caused the cartel to splinter into smaller networks. By 1996, 300 “baby cartels” had sprung up in Colombia, says Michael Lawrence of the Waterloo Institute for Complexity and Innovation in Canada, and they are still powerful today.

Mexican officials are currently copying the top-down approach, says Lawrence, but he doubts it will work. “Network theory tells us how tenuous the current policy is,” he says.

Now Colombian prosecutors have a new tool to add to their investigation methods: network analysis. This can be an integral part of the modern war on drugs, says Eduardo Salcedo-Albaran, director of the Vortex Foundation based in Bogotá.

Vortex uses network-analysis algorithms to construct diagrams for court cases that show the interactions between cartel members, governors and law enforcers.

These reveal links that are not otherwise visible, what Salcedo-Albaran calls “betweeners” - people who are not well-connected, but serve as a bridge linking two groups. In Mexico and Colombia, these are often police or governors who are paid by the cartels. “The betweener is the guy who connects the illegal with the legal,” says Salcedo-Albaran. Because many cartels depend on their close ties with the law to operate successfully, removing the betweeners could devastate their operations.

(via Destroying drug cartels, the mathematical way - physics-math - 17 October 2012 - New Scientist)

futurescope:

Crime Prediction algorithm improves police deployment to reduce property crime by 25%

via nextbigfuture:

A recent study suggests that computers could be better than seasoned police analysts at predicting when and where crime will strike next in a busy city.

Software tested in Los Angeles was twice as good as human analysts at predicting where burglaries and car break-ins might happen, according to a company deploying the technology.

When police in an L.A. precinct called Foothill division followed the computer’s advice—and focused their patrols within the areas identified—those areas experienced a 25 percent drop in reported burglaries, an anomaly compared to neighboring areas.

[read more @nextbigfuture & @techreview]

(via emergentfutures)

The future of security, law enforcement and Big Brother’s tools.

futurescope:

A Fingerprint Scanner That Can Capture Prints From 20 Feet Away

via popsci:

Gaining access to your gym or office building could soon be as simple as waving a hand at the front door. A Hunsville, Ala.-based company called IDair is developing a system that can scan and identify a fingerprint from nearly 20 feet away. Coupled with other biometrics, it could soon allow security systems to grant or deny access from a distance, without requiring users to stop and scan a fingerprint, swipe an ID card, or otherwise lose a moment dealing with technology. […]

[read more @popsci | @dvice] [IDair] [image credit: Wikimedia Commons]

(via emergentfutures)

ageofperil:

You’re gonna love this, Tumblr fans. Some cows went missing in North Dakota. Six in all. Here is what local authorities decided was necessary to search for said bovine:

  • A SWAT team
  • A bomb squad
  • The highway patrol
  • Deputies from three surrounding counties
  • A Predator drone

Yes, a Predator…

(via ageofperil-deactivated20130204)